The combination bedside light and alarm clock offers a more pleasant way to wake up by gradually illuminating to simulate a sunrise and follows the natural waking rhythms of the body. This illumination is further enhanced by a diverse range of sounds – from those derived from nature to gentle ambient noises – that accompany the waking experience. These sounds were designed by a sound artist specifically for the Wake-up Light. 

When fully illuminated, the lamp resembles a sunset with a divider between the luminescence above and the dark part of the object below.

Philips Design’s consumer research program found that consumers are listening more closely to nature and following its patterns, linking back to their biological clock. There is a strong desire to focus on natural timings and seasonal changes, and an intuitive life rhythm is emerging.

The Philips research program also showed that the bedroom is thought to be a very personal and intimate space and, while its design used to remain quite static, there is a trend toward frequent redecoration.

Styles are moving away from the minimal toward an emphasis on comfort and the decorative, with objects becoming more important in the bedroom interior.

So, with reference to a lampshade in terms of the shape and materials used – glass, ceramics and metals – the Wake-up Light was designed to be a desirable interior object rather than a technological device.

The display panel is inside the product rather than on the outside (as on a traditional alarm clock), making the product less obtrusive. Housing the display icons in this way, the light offers a simple, streamlined look and feel.

The on/off button, a long, metal switch that protrudes from the light, was designed to be very visual and easily accessible. It allows the user to see the status of the alarm from across the room.

“We tried to refresh the idea of an interior object that blends into the environment,” said Jack Mama, creative director at Philips Design. “The Wake-up Light draws on our experience from the Simplicity Events as to how to create simplicity in complex products. The challenge is to design products that are easy to use, have relevance for people and are very technically advanced.” 
 

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