Radiologists are one group of health professionals working towards improving diagnosis, treatment and a concept to support them is being developed around a project called The Reading Room of the Future.

The concept includes a complete ‘reading room’ or working environment that addresses the needs and the challenges of radiologists. It combines advanced technology and high design to deliver solutions that simplify the work and enhance the work environment.

A concept from Philips Design, and part of the company’s Vision of the Future program – the reading room is based on real world research and addresses current world problems for radiologists.

According to Philips, the Vision of the Future program is an in-depth, forward looking exploration of projects identified for strategic business development. In some cases the company will investigate as far as twenty years ahead, taking emerging ‘societal signals’ and exploring how they could potentially shape lives in years to come.

The Reading Room of the Future is an optimised environment for applying and sharing knowledge. Touch panel operation simplifies procedures, and interaction with other specialists in the hospital and beyond is supported. The room is dark enough for concentrating on images, yet bright enough to write and discuss cases with colleagues.

It appears that in the past there has never been a holistic solution addressing problems faced by radiologists in their work. This concept addresses the balance of social and private space, personal and collaborative work, efficient and effective communication with colleagues across the globe and supportive tools that help simplify reading and increase accuracy of diagnosis.

Based on detailed hospital visits and interviews seeking insight into the needs of radiologists, the design team has created an entire system from furniture to space, lighting, software and people interaction. 

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