The awards, co-sponsored by the Industrial Designers Society of America and Business Week magazine, attracted entries from around the world once again.

Hewlett Packard, Nike and Philips were the top winners from the corporate world. Thirty-eight entries were awarded gold, fifty-nine silver and fifty-one bronze.

Jury chair Tucker Viemeister, president of Springtime-USA in New York, and a team of judges praised the winners’ professionalism, describing the work as outstanding.

“Never before has good design been acknowledged as being so essential to good business,” he said.

“By connecting with the consumers, winning designers created outstanding products that people both desire and need.”

Larry Keeley, president of Doblin Inc said the real story of the 2005 IDSA competition is simple: “We’ve moved beyond mere great design. Now you must seek strategic market transformation to succeed,” he said.

“Soon thoughtful clients everywhere will know that in any tough marketplace they’ll need a design strategy that has the power to advance their corporate strategy as a whole, making something better isn’t enough. Now you have to make it different and demonstrably superior.”

According to Marc Gobe, chairman of Desgrippes Gobe, the human touch from an ergonomic perspective was prevalent.

“A post modern approach to the individual is superceding the dogmatic modern design approach we have seen in the last century. The consumer is winning for sure.” 


 

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