The Victorian design industry directly employs about 67,000 people and generates $4.8 billion for the economy.

At a gala event to celebrate the awards, Victorian Premier Steve Bracks named Melbourne architect Allan Powell as the winner of the 2004 Victorian Premier’s Design Award, for his design of TarraWarra Museum of Art in Yarra Glen.

“The TarraWarra Museum of Art is a world-class gallery and a reflection of Australia’s world-class design capability,” Mr Bracks said.

The winner was selected from seventy-two projects, which went on display at the Melbourne Museum.

Entries in the awards included areas of innovation, arts, sustainability and environment, manufacturing, export, ICT, education and training, planning, transport and major projects.

Two $5,000 Highly Commended awards were presented to Garry Emery Design for the visual identity of the Ian Potter Museum at NGV Australia and to Gentil Eckersley for a guidebook promoting the Sydney Esquisse 2003 festival. 

An Award for Promise was presented to emerging designer Deborah West for Lace, a creative structure that has many possible applications.

The Melbourne Museum Acquisition Prize was awarded by Dr J Patrick Greene, the Chief Executive Officer of Museum Victoria, to design firm Eness for Virsual – The Digital Rocking Horse. The Virsual team were also awarded the People’s Choice Award.

The Melbourne Design Prize, which recognises an outstanding design initiative that inspires and enhances life in Melbourne, was awarded to Lab architecture studio for the design of Federation Square.

The Design 2004 Awards judging panel included visiting international designers, Anton Beeke (Netherlands), Sam Buxton (UK), Marco Casagrande (Finland), Martine Gyselbrecht and Jan Van Mol (Flanders).  

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