Seymour and Ward, who both graduated from university only three years ago with honours in industrial design, recently exhibited their lighting concepts at the Hot House at designEX in Melbourne. 

Tom Seymour’s lighting range features ‘design for disassembly’ as an underlying production method. There is no use of fasteners or glue and the end result is not unlike Origami and its many folds.

Seymour’s lighting features modular parts which, when assembled, create a ‘regal’ aesthetic. The forms are reminiscent of Elizabethan style ‘ruffles’ and each light has been anointed with regal names such as Ruff, Queen and King lamp and Royal Love. 

Three out of five of the lights in Seymour’s range are made up of twelve to eighteen parts that are exactly the same. The other two lights are created by curling and cutting sheet polypropylene and attaching them to a central acrylic tube.

Seymour says the modular approach works because “if one part is damaged during use or in transit, you can just pull one segment out and replace it, rather than replace the full shade”.

“All parts are creased and cut out of polypropylene sheet and then it is just a matter of folding them together,” he said. 

There is a clear polypropylene sheet material on the inside and an opaque white on the outside with the two layers creating a hollowed form. There is great scope for creating different colour effects or printing on some of the surfaces.

“I was playing with a piece of paper, I was folding it back on itself and just thought it was an interesting shape so I played with it a bit more. All the models were then based on the same principle with the same element repeated over and over.”

The lights are being distributed by Corporate Culture Australia.

Anton Ward’s light, developed with designer Michael Cornish, is a contrast in its very thin, very flat and very unobtrusive look.

According to Ward the aesthetic originally related to executive desks. Called The Wafer, it’s a slick and well executed light.

“I wanted it to be obviously thin but to provide more of an ambient light source. The materials I have used are aluminium and acrylic sandwiched together with a central circuit board strip powering an array of LEDs.”

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