Entries came from small to medium-sized companies and the big innovators in the industrial sectors – representing a strong mix of innovation – including new design talent, established design firms, product manufacturers as well as corporate giants.

“Companies have realised that investing in design offers a considerable added value. In the end, the design of a product is the most important incentive for the purchase decision of a consumer,” explains Professor Dr Peter Zec, red dot President.

The 30-strong jury of experts tested and examined each product entry live and on site in Essen, Germany. A mammoth task, with some 4515 entries, across 19 categories, put to the test. Winning entries were selected for their impressive levels of innovation, functionality, quality and environmental compatibility.

The enormous selection of entries included products ranging from tiny biomedical devices to large-scale building projects.

After the Design Studio of the Year Award, the highest award within the red dot: product design award program is the red dot: best of the best. This year only 1.37 per cent of entries were given this accolade; 71.23 per cent of total entries did not achieve a red dot: product design award.

With so many entries, and hundreds of noteworthy designs, we include a selection here from the 2012 red dot: best of the best winners.   

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Mind control

Mind control

What if the Prius were a bicycle? This is the simple question Toyota and its advertising agency Saatchi Los Angeles asked themselves.

Share, You
Giving the old FJ new life

Giving the old FJ new life

A concept car that combines a blast from the past with some of the latest in automotive technology has been unveiled to the public. The Holden Efigy, a reincarnation of the original 1953 FJ Holden with new concepts, is more like a hot rod than a family car.

News, Play, You

Profiting from your IP

Like any commodity, a company’s Intellectual Property (IP) is a powerful and valuable asset – generally created for financial gain. In some cases it can represent a monopoly in product, service or design.

Work

Sizing up the competition

Belinda Stening, Curve editor, spoke to three awards-program directors - Brandon Gien, Chelsea Sutula and Ralph Weigmann about their design award programs.

Share, Work