Although they’re a practical item and essential for fishermen and other outdoor enthusiasts, most fishermen aren’t looking for the bling factor – gumboots are treated by most as purely utilitarian footwear and the focus is generally solely on the functionality of the item.

Yet, the bottom line is, they’re generally all black, rubber and pretty much identical when lined up on the shelf, regardless of quality. As such, gumboots have difficulty standing out. In a sea of black, the ones that will get picked up first are the ones that attract the consumer’s attention. Enter Kazakhstan design company, Good! Agency.

Good! was approached by the client to create a type of package for Fisherman rubber boots that would give them the market edge by making them stand out and highlighting the features of these utilitarian shoes. The goal was to create a contemporary and appealing image for the brand that illustrated the high quality of the product and would make them stand out on the shelf to attract consumer attention.

Rubber boots are often underestimated. While their primary function – to protect feet from water – is obvious, all gumboots are not created equal, even though this isn’t necessarily apparent to the naked eye. So the objective, in addition to making them stand out, was to communicate this to the consumer through the packaging that the Fisherman rubber boots are a specialised footwear item for fishing with superior features. In addition to offering protection from the water, they are, in fact, able to shield fishermen from a number of hazards, such as sharp rocks and driftwood, broken glass and wire, dangerous underwater creatures, and potential electrical and chemical hazards.

The design team decided that the best way to visually communicate these features of the boots to the consumer was through using the example of underwater creatures. Not only is the image relevant and appealing to fishermen, it also provided the opportunity to illustrate other underwater risks that the boots protect the wearer against.

The package was designed as a mini-stand creating a type of optical illusion where it appears the boots are sitting in a small tank of water filled with dangerous underwater creatures. The packaging specifically allows the consumer to instantly interpret the protective qualities of the boot at a glance – identifying the sharp teeth of the fish, the claws of the crab, the electricity of the eel – at the same time as their eye sweeps over the catchphrase: “Protects from water and even more”.

The imagery creates the additional opportunity of being able to combine several types of threats in one image – for instance, the electric eel also symbolises electrical and biological hazards in the water. The upper part of the box is an illustration of a ripple effect on the water, suggesting that there are a lot of hidden underwater hazards, yet as long as you are wearing the Fisherman rubber boots, you’ll be safe.

Working like a small display case, it’s sexier than your ordinary shoebox, with vibrant, eye-catching shelf appeal.

Good! was awarded the Platinum Pentaward 2012 in the Best of the Other Markets category for the Fisherman rubber boot packaging.

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Ferrari focus of the future

Ferrari focus of the future

Student designers from thirteen countries have created an exciting exhibition of Ferrari vehicles of the future, now on display at Germany’s Red Dot Museum.

News, Play, Share

Redefining excellence

The Windows Phone 7, by the Windows Phone design team, was designed around who users are, rather than what they do, to focus on making the end user ‘king’.

Work
Pop up space saver

Pop up space saver

The classical paper folding Chinese take-away box has provided plenty of inspiration for a new range of Tupperware containers.

Rest, You
Closer collaboration

Closer collaboration

User friendly, user experience, people friendly technology, multi-touch functionality… these are all desirable design traits driving business solutions that encourage greater interaction between people and technology.

Share