While in the past, creativity and well-founded know-how were sufficient for the perfect start to a successful career, today – from my view – it is necessary to also compete on an international stage and to have experts assess the quality of your work. Design competitions offer the kind of international confirmation that young designers need to exist and establish themselves in these fast-changing markets. Winning a design competition increases their self-esteem and reflects strong conceptual skills. 

Winning an award can guarantee worldwide visibility and strong media attention. The biggest and most prestigious design awards offer young talent a great chance to present themselves and their work in competition with established designers and prepares them for professional challenges. They know: when they win, they win at the highest possible level.

The participation in a competition is a great chance to strengthen the trust of potential clients in their creative potential. Like in sports, taking part is always better than just watching the others being honoured and fulfilling one’s own dreams. Through their success, they can validate whether they are following the right path or not.

There are unlimited possibilities in the world of design. As creativity knows no boundaries, the next generation of talent should look beyond the horizon, stay cross-culturally inspired and break new ground. This requires a lot of courage and intellectual flexibility: to think in new directions, not to conform to general opinion, but to create their own distinctive style. At the end of the day, as a young person, you need a strong backbone to achieve these aims.


Innovative ideas for the future need creative minds. 
In order to enable the next design generation to participate successfully, the program ‘red dot young professionals’, by which red dot especially wants to support young new and upcoming designers, was brought into being. Young designers with academic degrees dating back no longer than five years, can register for one of 50 free applications. We have many hundreds of young designers applying each year.

To find out where you stand, the ‘red dot: junior prize’, for instance, honours the most outstanding work of 
a junior designer every year. The distinction for young talent is awarded in the ‘red dot: junior award’ and is rewarded with €10 000. This can give a decisive advantage in the start of a career, and is the perfect 
opportunity to compete not only with other students, but also with leaders of communication design. It proves the fact that it is well worth it for talented newcomers to invest in their own design quality.

In particular, in the world of communication design, young designers have to adapt to ever-changing conditions. The increasing media coverage in our everyday world reveals a huge range of information 
from which we can choose every hour, minute and second. Accordingly, young up-and-coming communication designers have to find new responses to changing requirements.

Regarding the keywords ‘globalisation’ as well as 
‘information overload’, designers must provide neutral evidence of their contemporary and adequately adapted skills. And this is where worldwide recognised design competitions come into play. They provide an enormous wealth of creativity and offer a forum for excellence in design and visions of the future.  
 

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