“When we were asked by ophelis to develop a piece of furniture that should populate the area between the workstations, the concept of ‘Islands in the office’ quickly emerged,” says Meier. “It is important not to view the docks as separating islets. Instead, we have designed a system that makes it possible to connect people and areas, and to make use of these connections in a variety of ways. Docks are islands in the office and also the connecting web between these islands.”

Extremely flexible and versatile by design, the individual modules can be arranged independently on the carrying base. The design allows them to be positioned in order to provide acoustic and visual privacy or, alternatively, to create open-plan meeting areas.

“The tendency for open, decentralised office models is a paradigm shift that is emerging on many levels throughout the working world,” explains Grosch. “We view our design as bridging the tension between the demand for a permanent exchange of information and ubiquitous communications on the one hand, and the need for privacy and space for relaxation and concentration on the other.”

Cable channels allow complete electrification and grid connection, while the elements of Docks have been designed to match the dimensions of ophelis furniture, allowing for shelving and cabinets to be seamlessly integrated.

“We see Docks as a flexible ingredient in the constantly changing world of work,” adds Meier. “Due to its modular nature it is designed to continuously keep evolving in line with the needs of a transforming
work culture.”

 

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