A solar-powered light with a difference, this hockey puck-shaped device absorbs the sun during the day on one side, and it emits light in the evening from the other side.

The design is as simple as it is effective. It has two functional sides. One receives light from the sun via a photovoltaic solar panel when placed in direct sunlight, such as beside a window. As the name suggests, the user then switches – or flips – the device after dark and it emits soft light for several hours.

The name Switch also refers to the actual switch. Buttonless by design, to turn the light on, a hidden tilt switch is activated when the device is flipped over. There are three main elements in the composition: a satin polypropylene housing, an acrylic lens and the ABS inner core, which holds the electronic components.

Switch Light is 8.5 cm in diameter by 3.5 cm in height – large enough to cast an adequate amount of light, while also being small enough even for the youngest members of the household to flip.

With no cords or buttons, Switch Light is simple to use, and can also easily be transported from room to room – or even outdoors – as requirements dictate, without having to seek out pesky, power-sucking wall sockets. The uses for such a no-outlet, no-battery lamp seem limitless: as a nursery night light, for evening cocktails by the pool, on camping trips – just to name a few.

It’s an environmentally friendly solution that’s bound to cast a warm glow on every user’s face.

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