The Cobrina Collection – the result of a collaboration between Torafu Architects and well-established Japanese furniture manufacturer, Hida Sangyo – includes a chair, a table, a stool, a bench, a sofa, a livingtable, an AV cabinet, an islandcabinet and a hangerstand.

“We sought to create light furniture that can be easily rearranged or repurposed,” said Torafu. As such, rounded top surfaces and slender slanting legs are characteristic of the range, lending an unobtrusive and mellow air to their surroundings.

For instance, the Cobrina chair is slightly shorter in height, allowing it to be tidily stowed under the table. With the tabletop, the semicircular shape allows it to be set close against the wall, which means space can be used more efficiently. The stool can be used as either a seat or as a side table, while the island cabinet stacks four shelves and, when placed between the living and dining rooms, allows access from both sides.

Available in various colours, patterns and materials, the pieces can be tailored to either home or office use.

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