Designed by Seymourpowell in the UK, the unique chassis features two padded carbon fibre fins, joined at the front by an adjustable bridge structure.

The angle of the fins can easily  be adjusted if a horse changes shape or if the saddle needs to fit a different horse.
The saddle has engineered flexibility to enable a horse to achieve its full range of movement. The stiffness and pressure points associated with traditional saddles are almost completely eradicated.
Curve Issue twenty-six, 2009
‘High in the saddle’ by Belinda Stening

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