In drawing on the everyday I aim to reconsider the meaning and use of objects we engage with and reintroduce an imaginative aspect into the life of commonplace things. From this point I will pick out and gather impressions and record them.

I work in a journal for this and also to develop the ideas for further work. It is a record of the ways I have been thinking and can reveal areas of thinking that I was not conscious of at the time.

My studio work nearly always starts from the point of flatness. Flat drawing or plans that are then popped out into three-dimensional paper and card models.

My interest in the line and the fold came from a desire to reduce the spatial concerns of things to their absolute minimum, the line belonging to flatness and the fold belonging to form.

Popped out from a two dimensional surface, forms can also recall modern manufacturing techniques and packaging, the sense of child like wonder involved in the transition from two dimensions to three and the ability of objects to speak with minimal intervention.

With the Vehicle Series that I am working on at the moment, the initial objects came about in this way... and from a fascination with movement in the urban environment and the way movement is being transformed in the digital age – from physical to virtual.

Having established the computer as part of the making process meant that I could research industrial techniques through which I could extend my practice.

The photochemical milling process seemed an ideal process to apply to jewellery that had a graphic influence. It can be applied to a variety of thin sheet metals including precious metals and refractory metals. I am currently using stainless steel.  

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