As riders saddle up on the rocking horse equipped with its own motion sensor device, a three dimensional game is activated and displayed on screen.

First conceptualised seven years ago by Eness, a software and design house in Melbourne, Virsual has been touring Australia with Experimenta’s House of Tomorrow exhibition.

While the game may never beat the real thing it could rate a close second for many children. Riders journey through a vast simulated environment on Virsual’s island, along the way travelling through fields, collecting apples and horse shoes, heading towards the end of the rainbow. By rocking faster, the rider increases their speed across the terrain.

Eness says its aim was to design the ultimate toy of the future – a toy that is intuitive and fun for all ages. The designers see Virsual as a navigation device that entertains and educates a child as they navigate through a virtual game environment minus a mouse
or joystick.

Virsual is a wireless device that runs on a conventional PC computer equipped with a graphics card. The game ‘engine’ was built in-house by Eness, while the hardware was designed and developed on computer with the aid of CNC machining technology. 
 

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

New

New

Package designers are often privately critical of the short time allotted to the design of packaging of new products.

Share
Agents of change

Agents of change

Passionate about architecture and enthusiastic about technology, Macedonia-born Tatjana Dzambazova is the Senior Product Manager, Creative Consumers in a new group at Autodesk called Autodesk Consumer Group, the mission of which is to ‘unlock creativity in everyone’.

Share

Compact style

‘Cobrina’ – a word derived from the Japanese expression ‘koburi-na’, used to describe things that are smallish or undersized – is a series of small-sized pieces of furniture that allow space to be used more effectively.

News
The new French connection

The new French connection

“He is now considered an overall creator, a reference point to get a glimpse of what’s going on. He is no longer a designer,” said lawyer Philippe Ouakrat to French newspaper Libération in 2003 about his client Philippe Starck.

Rest, Share