Orhan Irmak’s Istanbul, combined tradition and modernity to create a package containing a series of four glasses with coasters for the traditional Turkish drinks: tea, raki, yoghurt and water.

“Design is the interpretation of the world in some way or another,” says Irmak. “If you come from a city like Istanbul, which is centuries old, then traditions provide valuable clues for the designer.”
 

The bag-in-a-box packaging of hauswein.de, a professional range of quality wines sold over the Internet, uses a specially developed colour system to communicate specific tastes and aromas.

“The terms used to characterise the wines were taken from the field of aromas and then translated into a colour system,” say designers and owners Hayn and Willemeit, of Hayn/Willemeit Media, Germany. The three colours assigned to each wine correspond to respective aromas.

The junior award was won by three Korean designers – JungHyun Lee, NoJae Park and DukSang Yoon – for their Enermax battery package (designed for Seoul National University), which offers solutions to the problems associated with the storage and disposal of batteries.

The concept is based on the fact that although batteries can be recycled, only ten per cent are presently disposed of this way. Every year, tons of heavy metals are released into the earth from discarded batteries.

The pack is opened by folding along a perforated line on the outer sleeve. Empty batteries can be returned to the pack and resealed at the breakage line. This keeps batteries safe until they can be recycled. The trio hope the pack will encourage people to store used batteries until they can be safely disposed of.

Lewis Moberly’s, range of fifty-eight ‘cook’s ingredients’ for Waitrose Limited, uses a clean aesthetic that connects all products with clear, powerful typography supported by muted background colours.

“The labels encourage the consumer to take ‘a dash of this’ or a pinch of that. In an informal way they reflect the knowledge and confidence of the cook and create an animated dialogue with the consumer at the display.”

“Clarity of information is critical in our work,” says Mary Lewis. An aesthetic purity is something we aim for in everything we do. Honesty is a natural partner of purity and our designs project a promise that has to be delivered.”  
 

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