Reviewed by an expert panel of judges, chaired by Charles L Jones, FIDSA, chief design officer at Masco Corporation, the winners were announced on January 8 – with twelve gold, six silver and two bronze winners.

The best of the best was in the Innovation category: Target’s ClearRx by Deborah Adler and Sonic Design, USA. A clear, logical prescription drug package, for use in pharmacies, the design illustrates a quantum leap in pill bottle design.

The design was conceived as a thesis project by Deborah Adler after her grandmother became ill from misunderstanding the labelling on a pill bottle and taking the wrong dosage of prescription medication.

Adler believed the communication design of the pill bottle needed to be fundamentally overhauled.

Target engaged with Adler and hired Sonic Design’s Klaus Rosburg, to shape the industrial design process, resulting in a pill bottle that is easier to hold and read. The bottles have a distinctive rounded-wedge shape with a wide, flat face.

The information is much more clearly presented and hierarchically organised so that the label is easy to read, especially the most important information – patient name, drug name and instructions.

The patient can also request a small magnifying strip, which can be inserted into the side of the bottle for customers with visual impairments.

The bottles are designed to stand on their caps and for liquid medicines, the spill-proof cap and oral syringe makes measuring infallible and simple.

One of the fundamental features to the design is the personalised colour-coded ID rings, which allows different members of a household to distinguish their individual prescriptions at a glance. Target’s Clear Rx bottles were hailed by IDSA’s esteemed jury as the standout Design of the Decade.

Winning in the Solution to a Developed World Social Problem category was Inogen One R G2 by Inogen Inc.

A portable oxygen concentrator and generator, the device affords freedom and mobility to oxygen patients, designed to be used easily everyday and even for travel.

The design has a strong user interface, particularly targeted at the elderly. Inogen One concentrates oxygen from the ambient air, which saves customers US$140 per month.

Additionally, it uses almost eighty-five per cent less electricity than stationary oxygen concentrators, so it also saves the user hundreds of dollars per year on electricity costs, particularly beneficial for patients who are on fixed incomes.

Omnipod Insulin Management System by Continuum USA won gold in the Most Responsible Design Solution category.

The insulin management system provides an intuitive, nearly invisible solution to make living with diabetes easier, affording a better quality of life and increased independent from insulin therapy.

The device is very discrete, with an absence of any tubes or wiring, making is less visible, and also watertight, so users can even engage in swimming.

The Design of the Decade winners will go into the permanent collection of the Henry Ford Museum to help tell the story of American innovation in this century and the large role that industrial design is playing in that story. 

For more information about Design of the Decade, go to www.idsa.org/dod

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