With its LCD screen the traditional ‘photo frame’ can display single photos, thumbnails or slideshows. Recognising Philips as a leader in research as well as design, the digital photo display has won a number of international awards, including the iF Design award 2006, a Red Dot award in March this year as well as a Good Design Award in Japan and Taiwan.

This revolutionary idea was first envisioned as a concept in the 1995 Philips Vision of the Future project aimed at exploring life and technology in the near future. By carrying out extensive research into socio-cultural trends alongside developments in technology, Philips wanted to ensure that products and services would come closer to meeting human needs and desires.

According to Philips, the research revealed that the ‘individualisation’ of society had loosened national and family ties. Increased mobility meant families were becoming more fragmented, with a weakened sense of community. The research found that as family members moved away from home in search of employment, there was a feeling of separation and isolation.

Amongst its many revolutionary ideas, Philips demonstrated the Family Tree, an interactive picture frame that brought together existing digital archive material with viewing and sharing of precious memories. The Digital Photo Display is a product based on that Family Tree concept.

The research showed that although digital cameras are widely accepted as the future of quality photography, many people feel that their photos get stuck in ‘PC prison’, never to see the light of day.

Philips found that no more that twenty per cent of the pictures taken ever get printed out. Research has also shown that people have been looking for a better way to view and share digital images as, until now, options for displaying digital photos were limited to notebook computers, PCs and televisions.

As we now live in a world where electronic equipment and digital entertainment plays a dominant role in the living room, the digital photo display is an extension of that lifestyle.

The high pixel density screen displays eighty eight percent more pixels per square inch than a 17-inch LCD monitor screen, and reproduces rich detail and vibrant colors. It stores up to eighty digital images as well as directly displaying photos from a memory card.

The interface is simple and intuitive, and no programming or PC is required. The digital photo display can be oriented in landscape or portrait, and has a removable stand for portability. It runs on AC power or a rechargeable battery and portable enough to share your photos with anyone, anywhere.  

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