For the Safety Catch exhibition the designers were asked to create three-dimensional designs for the ‘space that lies between the ordinary and the shocking’. The designs are varied in scope, ranging from small objects to large installations, from the serious to the light-hearted.

Safety Catch runs 7-27 August at the UTS Gallery.

Adam Goodrum’s work is a sculptural installation made up of individual interlocking elements creating a lattice tower. He calls it a “visual and structural exploration of medieval armour and its tradition of providing physical security.”

“The installation is a celebration of the physical beauty of armour, independent of its function in war. Referencing chain mail and its traditional metal materials, it is a reinterpretation of armour in an architectural context. The tower represents a sanctuary, as in medieval times.

The installation piece by korban/flaubert is called i am exploding.

“This was an interesting exercise for us, exploring parallels between the muteness of objects and the muteness of ourselves in this current climate...”

The piece is an extreme multiplied extrapolation of a new lighting product by the pair, called ‘burstlight’, in anodised aluminium.

Ruth McDermott’s Security Net questions what the beach means to Australia in terms of security. She asks, “Is security an illusion? How do we know that the things that appear to be stable and safe are what they seem? I am using the Cronulla Beach riots of December 2005 in Sydney as a starting point for looking at this issue.”

“The beach is seen in Australia as belonging to all, to be democratic. The beach is enshrined in our memories of childhood, forever golden and offering a haven for the endless summers of the past.

“But is this reality or nostalgic longing? I am not commenting on the events of December 2005 themselves, but on how these occurrences made us feel that summer, as well as national and international reactions to the images seen in the media.

“My chosen medium is light. The work is both an object and an experience.” 

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