Users can quickly get into the phone, get out and back to their lives without using traditional user interface conventions of windows and frames.


“The Windows Phone 7 design began with a total reset on how we approached the entire design process,” says Chris Acker from the Windows Phone 7 design team. “The Start screen with Live Tiles defines the new Start experience. It’s where users go to kick things off, to get to all the things they want to do. It lets them launch into dynamic and real-time information when they need it – stuff like unread messages, current music, pictures of people they care about and a lot more,” he says. As such, it’s easy for the user to customise and surface their priority areas, making the phone uniquely theirs.
“It wasn’t until we focused on for whom we were really building our experience that we were able to move forward and build it right,” says Acker. “We call it BXT. We had to unite business, experience and technology and stop thinking feature by feature so that our users would have a connected end-to-end experience.” They redesigned the platform, “not only to do the heavy lifting of technology, but to support the visual look and motion we wanted to create,” explains Acker.

Curve Issue thirty-seven, 2011
‘Redefining excellence’ by Belinda Stening

read the original article

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