“There are some big themes that designers need to think about at the moment – particularly product and industrial designers like us – when you are actually creating things, not just two-dimensional graphics or communications.

“The best place to start is for designers now, and into the future, to have an understanding and grasp of three big changes in the direction of product design. The first is the ‘metaproduct’. Then there is ‘emotional ergonomics’ and ‘changing paradigms’.
“The emergence of the metaproduct should be consuming most of a product designer’s time at the moment. It is the integration of hardware, software and service provision. A metaproduct is a product that provides a complete experience for people.
“This is all consuming for product designers, because the kinds of skills needed to do great interface design are the skills of product designers and product design training. As this type of product design gets more and more complex and technically challenging, you need the kind of mind that a product designer has to carry out this sort of design work.”

Curve Issue thirty-five, 2011
 ‘Dick Powell’ by Belinda Stening

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