As riders saddle up on the rocking horse equipped with its own motion sensor device, a three dimensional game is activated and displayed on screen.

First conceptualised seven years ago by Eness, a software and design house in Melbourne, Virsual has been touring Australia with Experimenta’s House of Tomorrow exhibition.

While the game may never beat the real thing it could rate a close second for many children. Riders journey through a vast simulated environment on Virsual’s island, along the way travelling through fields, collecting apples and horse shoes, heading towards the end of the rainbow. By rocking faster, the rider increases their speed across the terrain.

Eness says its aim was to design the ultimate toy of the future – a toy that is intuitive and fun for all ages. The designers see Virsual as a navigation device that entertains and educates a child as they navigate through a virtual game environment minus a mouse
or joystick.

Virsual is a wireless device that runs on a conventional PC computer equipped with a graphics card. The game ‘engine’ was built in-house by Eness, while the hardware was designed and developed on computer with the aid of CNC machining technology. 
 

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