Presented by Good Design Australia, the coveted Good Design Australia Award of the Year for 2014 was announced at the gala awards night in Sydney on 28 May.

Dr Brandon Gien, CEO of Good Design Australia, said the judges felt that the Caroma Marc Newson Bathroom Collection, which was made up of  22 pieces, exemplified how the process of industrial design thinking can be applied to a longstanding everyday product to resolve challenges and issues and reach a beautifully designed outcome.

“This a stunning example of an iconic brand taking industrial design seriously and placing it at the core of their business strategy. The outcome is a beautifully resolved design language across the entire suite of products in this range. The outcomes of this design project will extend the brand value of Caroma and reinforce their commitment to original product design and cutting-edge innovation,” said the judges.

Dr Steve Cummings, Research and Development Manager at GWA Kitchens and Bathrooms said, “A major contributing factor in us winning this award was the very close and productive collaboration we had with Newson and his team, where we were able to maintain the full intent of Newson’s designs while incorporating Caroma’s advanced technologies”.

Dr Gien said the Net-Effect carpet tiles were a standout winner for the 2014 Good Design Award® for Sustainability. Net-Effect carpet tiles are made from recycled nylon waste from used fishing nets sourced from some of the world’s poorest fishing communities, and processed into new nylon carpet fibre.

Addressing the growing environmental problem of discarded fishing nets, Interface, in collaboration with the Zoological Society of London, Aquafil (global supplier of synthetic fibres) and Project Seahorse Foundation for Marine Conservation, have developed a community-based supply chain for collecting the fishing nets.

View the 2014 Good Design Australia winners.

 

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